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QUOTES


 

Foreign PolicyWhat keeps Eugene Kaspersky up at night?

September, 2012

Eugene Kaspersky, IT security expert and founder of Kaspersky Lab noted that cyberweapons have certain unique attributes that make them dangerous. “The difference between traditional weapons and cyber weapons is that it’s not possible to [re]assemble a cruise missile after it has been used,” he said. “Cyber weapons are different” because the victims “can learn from” weapons used against them. Full story …


 

ReutersU.S. and Russian experts turn up volume on cybersecurity alarms

September, 2012

And if recently discovered and government-sponsored intrusion software proliferates in the same way that viruses have in the past, “somewhere in 2020, maybe 2040, we’ll get back to a romantic time – no power, no cars, no trains,” said Eugene Kaspersky, chief executive officer of Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab, the largest privately held security vendor. Full story …


 

Financial TimesA tech tycoon who values privacy

September, 2012

“Aquisitions ruin company morale. Engineers want to innovate but when you acquire companies it says to them they are not good enough to innovate themselves.” … “In 1994, when we got our first contract with a US company, we were still tiny, but immediately our US competitors began using our Russian origin against us. I have no connection, no links with the Kremlin. I keep my distance, not only from them, but any other political party.” Full story …


 

Time WorldFinder of Flame Virus Tells Israel to Stop Before It’s Too Late

June, 2012

Eugene Kaspersky, the Russian cybersleuth: “Maybe there are some people here who are not happy with work I was doing with Stuxnet and Flame,” Then the keynote speaker, clad in jeans and an untucked linen shirt, leaned forward and said in a stage whisper, “I’m really sorry.” Waves of laughter and applause followed. “It’s not personal,” Kaspersky went on, drawing out the laughter, which had a quality of mutual congratulation. “It’s my job … So next time, be more careful.” Full story …


 

Sydney Morning HeraldBe afraid: Die Hard 4 reveals a real threat

May, 2012

“We came to the potential of cyber terrorist attacks years before Die Hard 4.0,” explains Eugene Kaspersky, the co-founder and CEO of security firm Kaspersky Lab. “But it was forbidden in my company to explain it to journalists, because I didn’t want to open Pandora’s Box. I didn’t want to let people think that my business is the business of fear. And I didn’t want the bad guys to learn from these ideas.” Full story …


 

ZDNetCybercrime golden age over in two years?

May, 2012

Speaking to ZDNet Australia and presenting at AusCERT 2012 this week, Eugene Kaspersky slammed the traditional model of regulation for technology and cybercrime, criticising it of being slow and unsuitable. “Traditional regulation — it’s far, far, far behind reality,” he said. He compared it to writing a book on emerging security issues (which he had been approached to do, but deemed it as being impossible). “Come on, it’s not possible. When a book is printed or published in any other way, it’s outdated. The history of IT security, yes, but not the present time, because it takes time. Same with regulation.” Full story …


 

BBC NewsThe world’s five biggest cyber threats

April, 2012

This could one day happen on a much bigger scale, warns Eugene Kaspersky. For example, entire nations could be plunged into darkness if cyber-criminals decided to target power plants. “It is possible that a computer worm doesn’t find its exact victim – and since many power plants are designed in a similar way [and often use the same systems], all of them could be attacked, around the world,” he says. “If it happens, we would be taken 200 years back, to the pre-electricity era.” International collaboration and treaties about the use of cyber weapons, similar to nuclear and biological arms control treaties, could help prevent such attacks. Full story …